Office Address

Rocky Mountain Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, LLC

Layton Address: 1660 W Antelope Dr STE 225 Layton, UT 84041 Tel: 801-773-4865 Fax: 801-775-9806

Food Allergy 2

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Food Allergy 2 2017-06-02T13:28:12+00:00

Treatment for Food Allergies

food allergiesWe are excited to announce our new innovative food allergy treatment program for Utah!  We are one of the rare practices in the country that offers a breakthrough treatment program for people with food allergies.  This treatment provides a long-term solution for milk, egg, peanut, and wheat allergic patients.  It usually takes less than six months, and at the end of the program, most patients are able to consume the foods that once threatened their health with no allergic reaction.

The treatment works by introducing minute doses of wheat, peanut, egg or milk in solution form for about 6 months, the time varying according to individual differences. The program progresses to small doses of the whole food for a number of months, allowing the patient to eat these foods. The treatment allows the vast majority of patients to overcome their wheat, milk, egg and peanut allergies.

If you are interested please call our office at 801-775-9800. Here is a list of Frequently Asked Questions!

Progressive Graded Food Challenge FAQs

The first day procedure will take about 6-8 hours. If there are no reactions during the oral immunotherapy, your child will be eating a full serving of the allergenic food in 4-5 months.
Exactly how it will go depends on each individual child. If everything goes well, some amount of the whole food will be ingested during the second-third month and a whole serving of the allergenic food may be ingested by the fourth month.
Peanut, Pecan and Cashew: The interval between dose increases is a minimum of seven days.

Egg: Early in the process there must be at least four days of home dosing between office visits for dose increases. For the last four doses the interval between dose increases is six days.

Milk: Early in the process there must be at least four full days of home dosing between office visits for dose increases. When the child begins drinking whole milk, the interval between changes is six days.

Wheat: Early in the process there must be at least four full days of home dosing between office visits for dose increases. For the last nine doses the interval between dose changes is six days.

Doses should be given about 12 hours apart. Try to make the interval between doses no less than 9 hours and no more than 15 hours.
Midday appointments should be avoided so that the dosing schedule will not be disrupted. Try to schedule dose increase appointments for early morning or late afternoon so that doses may continue to be given about 12 hours apart.
child food allergyChildren should be observed for at least one hour after the dose is given. They should not be allowed to sleep during this time.
There should be at least nine hours and no more than 15 hours between doses. NEVER increase the dose at home.
Treat the reaction the same way you would any food reaction; antihistamine if there is just rash, Epi-pen if there are other symptoms of anaphylaxis. If there is just one or a few hives, DO NOT give antihistamine for the first hour so we can see if the reaction progresses. If the hives are increasing, give antihistamine. Call us after the appropriate immediate intervention. We will give instructions on future dosing.
Do not administer the dose less than one hour before boarding and do not administer the dose while flying. If there are scheduling conflicts while traveling, give a dose just before leaving and just after returning. A letter explaining the procedure and need for food solutions for the Transportation Safety Authority is available on request.

Cashew, Pecan: When dosing with whole cashews or pecans patients will be required to buy their own nuts. Cashew butter or cashew flour may be substituted during cashew OIT. Pecan meal may be substituted in pecan OIT.

Peanut: When dosing with whole peanuts patients will be required to buy their own peanuts. Peanuts will be provided to the patient for the 1 and 2 peanut dose, but other peanut doses will be provided by the family. Peanut butter or peanut flour may be substituted as directed by Rocky Mountain Food Allergy Treatment Center staff.

Egg: The last four doses of egg white powder and all maintenance doses will be provided by the patient family. Egg white powder may be obtained from Barry Farm. The Barry Farm, 20086 Mudsock Rd, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895. www.barryfarm.com.

Milk: Once whole milk (undiluted) at full dose is being used, it can be prepared at home. Milk should be Horizon Organic Whole Milk.

Wheat: Once dosing with whole wheat bread begins parents will be responsible for buying bread for home dosing.

Egg white powder should be used for all dose increases and maintenance dosing. When the child is on the maintenance dose of 1 tablespoon of egg white powder per day, then other forms of egg may be added to the diet. Whole egg should never be used in place of egg white powder for the daily egg dose.
When the oral immunotherapy is complete, if everything goes well, maintenance doses may be given with either 2% or whole milk and any brand of cow’s milk may be used.
There are no preservatives in the food solution. It MUST be kept cold.
If the sample sits out for more than 30 minutes or if it appears to have spoiled, the solution must be replaced. Please call the office. If replacement is made during regular office hours, there is no charge. If replacement must be made at night or on a weekend or holiday there will be a charge of $100. This fee cannot be charged to your insurance.
We are NOT able to ship any solution or capsules. Preparations and every effort will need to be made to prevent this situation. Call the office as soon as you know there is a problem.
Call clinic or on call number to be directed on dosing throughout illness. If there is a gap of more than 15 hours between doses, call before giving the next dose. If it is less than 15 hours, pick up on the standard schedule.
Taste is personal; experiment. Try drink powder (Kool-Aide, Crystal Light), chocolate or another beverage. Small volumes could be mixed with a semi-solid food such as apple sauce or mashed potato but it is important that the entire dose of oral immunotherapy mixture be taken. If the total amount gets too large, it will be hard to get it all down.
No. Egg Beaters are NOT permitted because they are not complete eggs.
When can foods containing the allergenic food be introduced into the regular diet?”]Foods containing the allergenic food may be introduced into the diet at the end of the oral immunotherapy escalation process.
The number one goal is safety; to allow the patient to ingest the allergenic food and foods that contain the allergenic food without thinking about it.
When the full dose has been reached, there should be follow up at one month, three months, and then six months after that.
Time of day is not important but the amount of time between doses is important. We have achieved a delicate balance that depends on a certain amount of the allergenic protein being in the system at all times. You should try to give the once a day dose at the same time every day (24 plus or minus two hours).

Peanut, Cashew, and Pecan: Nut doses will be reduced to once daily after three months of successful maintenance dosing.

Exercise should be avoided for at least 30 min prior to dosing and two hours after dosing. Doses should not be given immediately following exercise. Exercise around the time of dosing increases the chance of a reaction. Exercise restriction applies to both escalation and maintenance dosing throughout escalation process and after graduation.
Peanut, Cashew, and Pecan: Your child must ingest 8 nuts once daily as a maintenance dose. Your child may also consume as much of the allergenic nut as he/she would like in addition to the daily maintenance dose upon completion of the oral immunotherapy process.

Egg: One tablespoon of egg white powder must be eaten daily as a maintenance dose, but your child may also consume as much egg as he/she would like in addition to
that.

Milk: Your child must ingest 240mL of milk daily as a maintenance dose following completion of the oral immunotherapy process, but your child may also consume as much milk as he/she would like in addition to that.

Wheat: Your child must ingest 1 slice of whole wheat bread daily as a maintenance dose following completion of the oral immunotherapy process, but your child may also consume as much wheat as he/she would like in addition to that.

We will have regularly scheduled follow-up appointments, and if the time comes when the frequency of the maintenance dose changes, we will let you know. Until then, your child must continue the maintenance dose as directed.

You may do a food challenge for a different food 1 week after completing oral immunotherapy.
Each Food OIT Program is food specific. Completing one program does not treat other food allergies. Ask your provider for more specific information for treating multiple food allergies.
Your child may begin a second oral immunotherapy program after he/she has been stable on a maintenance dose for one month.
The procedure is separate from office visits. The day one procedure is billed as desensitization. Subsequent doses are billed as an office visit. The actual reimbursement varies by insurance plan.

Why Food Allergy Treatment Is Important

Allergic reactions to food are not just a source of discomfort and hassle; they can be life-threatening. This is the biggest reason to seek a cure.

In addition, those with food allergies must be constantly vigilant about what they eat, discovering hidden ingredients and certain foods. Food allergies can lead to severe swelling, hives, itching, nausea, vomiting and digestion issues. A solution to this problem can mean an entirely improved life. Learn more about curing food allergies here.

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